Australia/New Zealand-based accreditation body JAS-ANZ is taking the problem of bogus ISO 9001 certificates seriously, apparently; or at least in India. Since December 2016 the IAF signatory accreditation body has withdrawn or suspended the accreditation of no less than ten India-based ISO 9001 registrars.

  • British Certifications Inc. (BCI) – Delhi. Accreditation suspended as of April 2017. The violations were apparently serious, prompting JAS-ANZ to report BCI was “issuing certificates outside their scope of accreditation. BCI is required to undergo a forensic audit as a precondition for continuing its accreditation.”
  • DUV Certification Private Limited (DUV CPL) – Uttar Pradesh. Accreditation withdrawn as of December 2016. JAS-ANZ accuses DUV of collusion “with a client to issue a certificate, which, for all intent and purposes, appeared to be a legitimate certificate, before completion of the certification process.”
  • Equalitas Certifications Limited (ECL) – New Delhi. Accreditation withdrawn as of December 2016 for failing “to provide any adequate response to reasonable demands for their compliance with the Conditions of Accreditation and failed to settle outstanding fees. They represent an unacceptable risk to the accreditation system.”
  • LMS Certifications Pvt. Ltd. (LMS)  – Lucknow. Accreditation withdrawn as of December 2016 for failing “to provide any adequate response to reasonable demands for their compliance with the Conditions of Accreditation and failed to settle outstanding fees.”
  • Absolute Quality Certification Pvt. Ltd. (AQC) – New Delhi. Accreditation withdrawn as of December 2016 for failing “to provide any adequate response to reasonable demands for their compliance with the Conditions of Accreditation and failed to settle outstanding fees.”
  • CDG Certification – New Delhi. Accreditation withdrawn as of December 2016 for failing “to settle outstanding fees.”
  • DRS Management System Pvt Ltd (DRS) Haryana Faridabad. Accreditation withdrawn as of December 2016 after “investigating several months the market practices” and an allegation they “intentionally provided false information to JAS-ANZ.”
  • Accredited Certification Services Pvt Ltd (ACS PVT LTD) – Pune Maharashtra. Accreditation withdrawn as of January 2017 for failing “to provide any adequate response to evidence that they issued certification without any procedural compliance.”
  • TNV Certification Pvt. Ltd. (TNV) – Lucknow. Accreditation withdrawn as of January 2017 after “TNV had their accreditation withdrawn by another International Accreditation Forum (IAF) accreditation body member without notifying JAS-ANZ, and failed to provide any adequate response to a show cause regarding noncompliance with the Accreditation Deed and the Conditions of Accreditation. They represent an unacceptable risk to the accreditation system.”
  • SGI Management Private Limited (SGI) – New Delhi.  Accreditation withdrawn as of February 2017 for failing “to control the use of their certification mark, and by association, the JAS-ANZ Symbol and the IAF MLA Mark, as required by the Conditions of Accreditation. SGI further failed to respond to a conditions of suspension, including acceptance of a forensic audit of their operations.”

See what we did there?

The JAS-ANZ “purge” is unusual because 100% of the listed registrars affected come from India, and yet JAS-ANZ accredits registrars from all over the world. While serious problems do exist in India with registrars issuing bogus ISO 9001 certificates and a huge number of worthless “certificate mill” certs issued in that country, it’s not a problem isolated solely to India. This begs the question as to why JAS-ANZ seems to be fixated on one country, with little effort done elsewhere.

A quick check by Oxebridge shows the JAS-ANZ action has had little practical effect, as the registrars in question have allowed their clients to keep publicizing their certifications anyway, and some continue to issue certificates. Without legal reinforcement — something JAS-ANZ is unlikely to pursue given the costs and complexities associated with international litigation — the gesture may end up being toothless.

Fraudulent, suspect or counterfeit ISO 9001 certificates are a problem throughout the world, and not just India, and it’s not a good sign that JAS-ANZ is focusing solely on one country. We can hope, however, that this is just the start of a new posture accreditation bodies to begin upholding the rules, and de-listing registrars that violate them.

We can hope.